When giving is easy

Create an ongoing legacy for a loved one, or family name

Giving should be simple

Giving should be rewarding, providing the giver a sense of fulfilment. It should be personal, because then it’s more meaningful. And it should be easy.

John Byrne gave a lot during his lifetime. He was a school teacher by profession and then extended that mentoring to help refugees, mainly young people, achieve their goals.

Past students speak highly of John, ‘I was influenced by John’s personality and attributes. He was a loving, caring, considerate, fair and open minded person, who taught me to believe in myself that I can do things.’

John’s sister Annette also speaks highly of her brother. It is evident that she would rather speak about him than about her decision to give.  No doubt that’s because she mourns his passing, but it’s also because her giving comes easily.

The John Byrne Memorial, a sub-fund of the State Trustees Australia Foundation, was created by Annette through a modest donation.  Indeed, each year Annette, along with some of John’s friends and family, continue to add to the original donation although  most of the donations are small.  When Annette’s, and John’s, mother died in 2013, many small donations were made to the John Byrne Memorial in lieu of flowers.

The donations are invested, with the idea that they will grow over time.  A portion of the memorial sub-fund is spent each year – given to eligible organisations in the community that, like John, are trying to improve the educational outcomes of young refugees and asylum seekers.  The scholarship amounts may seem small but are meaningful to the recipients; young students purchase text books and school uniforms, allowing more focus on learning.

Annette routinely thanks the Charitable Trusts team at the Foundation.  She is generous in her praise of our work as she is generous in the time she takes to ensure her brother’s giving lives on.   She, like her brother, has been giving for some time now – I suspect it all comes very easily to her.

Read more about the John Byrne Memorial.

What is a Charitable Trust?

A Charitable Trust is a trust established for charitable purposes. A Charitable Trust, and in particular the State Trustees Australia Foundation, encourages community philanthropy by offering individuals and companies an easy and effective way of donating money in the long-term to various charities within Australia.

I already give to charities – why would I want to set up a Charitable Trust?

A Charitable Trust allows you to provide your chosen cause or charity with a lasting gift, which will provide support well into the future. It also provides a wonderful opportunity to involve the whole family in the joy of giving to others, and can create an ongoing legacy for a loved one, or family name.

The main reasons for establishing a trust rather than giving directly to a charity are:

  • the value to the charity is greater over the long term;
  • it enables you to separate the timing of the tax benefit and charitable giving;
  • it provides greater oversight and control over where the money goes;
  • it enables you to maximise the benefit from tax concessions; and
  • it provides greater opportunity for family involvement.

State Trustees makes giving easy

We make it easy for you to donate money to the causes and charities you are passionate about.

There can be a lot of paperwork and administration involved in managing some types of Charitable Trusts. While each trust is different, we’ll look after all of these tasks for you, including:

  • reviewing and executing the trust deed or other agreements
  • establishing the trust fund
  • holding funds, securities, interest and other assets
  • managing the investment in a diversified fund to provide income and capital growth to cover the inflation rate in the long term
  • making payments into and out of the trust fund
  • attending meetings concerning the trust fund
  • managing grant applications and distributions
  • developing recommendations for effective grant-making
  • applying for income tax refunds
  • undertaking governance reporting requirements

 

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